2nd Lt. Mac Striplin, 93rd Troop Carrier Squadron, flew glider chalk number 29 on this operation.
He returned to base on 31 December 1944.

Take off and flight en route were good. Hit intensive flak about three minutes from LZ. Glider was struck in left wing by direct hit, and many holes were punched by flak fragments in fuselage and tail as well. Recognized LZ by smoke, cut properly an landed what looked to be a good field from the air. But when wheels touched I saw a large ditch and fence ahead, which I negotiated without damage to myself or load. Ground was slippery, and I had to dig in a wing in order to stop.
During the run in I noticed about 5 or 6 phenomena which I had never seen before and which I can not explain. They looked like silvery balls of tin foil, in the shape of a star and were about a foot wide. They seemed to float through the air. I did not see them rising from the ground, nor did I see any bursts. They just suddenly appeared before me. They did not dissipate; they passed out of my sight and I do not know what eventually happened to them. All of them were quite close to our flight. The nearest passed about 12 feet beneath my glider.
Flak and the above phenomena appeared along the north side of the RR running from Libramont to Bastogne.

Artillery unit unloaded glider. I went to Div. CP, being the first Glider pilot to arrive, and gave information where to find the small box of primers for the 155mm shells in each glider. I was asked by the commanding officer to accompany him and make sure all primers were removed from the gliders.
Upon starting to return to Bastogne, we were delayed one and one half hours while the enemy were shelling a bridge. When we returned, the other Glider Pilots had already been evacuated. I spent the night in Bastogne; it was heavily bombed and strafed by the Germans.
I saw no AA defense other than .50 cal machine guns. During my stay in Bastogne I saw a P-47 strafe our own troops. I was evacuated at 1230 hours, 28 December together with POWs and American troops being relieved. The trucks took us to Florenville where the VIII Coprs HQ sent me by jeep to Luxembourg City. Arrived there about 1800 hours, and had great trouble getting a place to eat and sleep. Left Luxembourg in a 94th TCS plane for Paris at 1445, 29 December, arriving at 1600h.
I noticed a 93rd TCS plane on the field and went to it, but for one reason or another it was ordered not to take off. We spent two nights in Paris in poor quarters near the field. Returned to A-39 at 1100h, 31 December.

Lt.-Col. Barnes, FA, at Bastogne said that as he saw us flying in he knew we would pass over intense flak, because he had known for some time that the Germans had flak positions on the course we flew.
Numerous people with whom I talked at Bastogne seemed to think that we should have known that the corridor had been opened by the 4th Armoured Division.
At Luxembourg a Lt.-Col., AC, connected with G-2 said that he would like to know who passed out the information that flak was south of the RR, because the fact of the matter was exactly reverse.

During the run in I noticed about 5 or 6 phenomena which I had never seen before and which I can not explain. They looked like silvery balls of tin foil, in the shape of a star and were about a foot wide. They seemed to float through the air. I did not see them rising from the ground, nor did I see any bursts. They just suddenly appeared before me. They did not dissipate; they passed out of my sight and I do not know what eventually happened to them. All of them were quite close to our flight. The nearest passed about 12 feet beneath my glider.
Flak and the above phenomena appeared along the north side of the RR running from Libramont to Bastogne.

The glider flown by 2nd Lt. Striplin in  a field north of Bastogne.
27DecemberglidermissionBastogneFormation